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Check My Assessment

The City of Regina encourages everyone to review their property's assessment.

To review your assessment, search for your property's assessment and taxation record online. When it appears, ask yourself the following questions:  

  1. Are the primary property characteristics displayed online correct for my property? (For example, if you own a two-storey home, does your online property characteristics indicate two-storey?)
  2. Are there any unusual circumstances not shown for my property that would affect its value (e.g. structural, location, etc.)?
  3. Are assessments of similar properties in my valuation neighbourhood similar to my assessment? (To compare, conduct a search of properties in your valuation neighbourhood by their assessed values. You can search by address or by using the interactive map.)
  4. Is my property's fair value assessment reflective of the sale prices of similar properties in the reference year (2015)?

If you have a question about your assessment, contact Service Regina at 306-777-7000 (Option 2) If after speaking to Assessment staff you feel your assessment is in error, you can submit an appeal to the Board of Revision when the Assessment Roll is open.

Property characteristics for residential homes

In step 1 above, you are asked to determine if your property's characteristics are correct. The primary property characteristics that determine a residential property's assessed value using the Sales Comparison Approach includes (but is not limited to):

  • the location of your property
  • approximate size of buildings on your property
  • construction quality of building(s)
  • style(s) of building(s) on your property
  • effective age(s) of building(s) on your property
  • condition(s) of building(s) on your property
  • your lot's size

Property characteristics for residential condominiums

In step 1 above, you are asked to determine if your property's characteristics are correct. The primary property characteristics that determine a residential condominium's assessed value using the Sales Comparison Approach includes (but is not limited to):

  • type and style of the condominium complex (e.g., vertical, horizontal, or loft conversion types of development; low-rise or hi-rise structures; garden style or apartment style.) See pictures below for examples of the different types of condo developments.
  • size of the condominium unit
  • location
  • effective age
  • construction quality
  • type of parking
  • if the unit has a balcony

A condominium is a term that refers to a form of legal ownership of a building and property, which consists of 2 parts. The first part, called a unit, is owned by and registered in the name of the purchaser of the unit. The second part is often known as the "common" or "shared" property, such as elevators, hallways or roofs. The common property is shared among the individual unit owners, along with the costs for its operation, maintenance and ongoing replacement.*

Picture of a horizontal condominium   Picture of a Garden Style condominium

Horizontal condominium (Single detached shown)  Other unit styles are townhouse and duplex.

 

Low-rise condominium (5 storeys or less) These may be either apartment style (interior entrances) or garden-style (exterior entrances)

Vertical Condominium   Picture of a building with bank at bottom and residential condos at top

High-rise condominium (6 storeys or greater)

 

Loft developments are those complexes that were originally constructed for some other use, like a warehouse. The units are unique in location, size and construction.

How the City obtained your property's characteristics

The City's Assessment Branch reviews information about residential properties obtained from recorded property characteristics, building permits, site visits and land title information. For residential condominiums, the Branch reviews information from condominium plans, building plans and assessment records to create a data characteristic profile for each condominium unit. Information about sales data for both residential homes and residential condominiums were obtained from Land Title transfers.

Using this information, the City can calculate the property’s assessed value following the rules and regulations set out by legislation and in the Saskatchewan Assessment Manual.

 

* Source: Canada Mortgage & Housing Corporation (CHMC) Condominium Buyer's Guide (2002) All rights reserved. Reproduced with the consent of CMHC. All other uses and reproductions of this material are expressly prohibited.