Flooding Cause - No Weeping Tile

Commonly referred to as weeping tiles or foundation drains, these underground water pipes offer an escape route for water collecting under houses. When water percolates through the backfill zone along the outside of basement walls, it collects in the weeping tile and flows by gravity to the sump pit.

Rainwater entering weeping tile varies from house to house. Weeping tile flow ranges from a few teaspoons to hundreds of gallons per day. Strongest flows usually happen during spring melt or from a long rainstorm.

To help you visualize your foundation drain, consider the following step-by-step description for new home installation of weeping tile.

Graphic of installing weeping tile in new house A backhoe is used to dig a hole for the basement to rest in. The size of the hole or excavation should be as small as practically possible, yet allow room for work crews. The base of the excavation is to be as flat as possible.
Graphic of installing weeping tile in new house A concrete footing is poured about 60 centimetres from the perimeter of the excavation on undisturbed soil. The footing is where the basement walls and floor will rest.
Graphic of installing weeping tile in new house Weeping tile is a 15 centimetre plastic pipe with small holes throughout. It is tucked against the footing (not on the footing) and placed around the entire outer edge of the footing and leads to the sump pit. 
Graphic of installing weeping tile in new house After the basement wall is poured on top of the footing, as shown below, a layer of coarse gravel is placed between the undisturbed soil and level with the top edge of the footing.
Graphic of installing weeping tile in new house Finally, soil is pushed into the open hole covering the weeping tile and filling the space between the foundation and the edge of the excavation. Again, this soil is referred to as backfill and, when complete, the backfill zone.